The MIT Licence, Line-by-Line

Outstanding bit of legal writing by Kyle Mitchell: First, “including without limitation” is a legal antipattern. It crops up in any number of flavors: “including, without limitation” “including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing” “including, but not limited to” many, many pointless variations All of these share a common purpose, and they all fail to achieve it reliably. Fundamentally, drafters who use them try to have their cake and eat it, too. In The MIT License, that means introducing specific examples of “dealing in the Software”—“use, copy, modify” and so on—without implying that licensee action has to be something…

Photography is dead, thanks to the culture algorithms

Algorithmic, formula-driven music was the topic of a much longer (2200-word) post I wrote this weekend. Now Apple gives us unashamedly algorithmic photography, to take all the work out of creating an interesting picture. So now twentysomethings can not only make people think they’re having far more fun than they really are on Instagram, they can make people think they’re far more talented than they really are as well.  Cultural bankruptcy. The iPhone 7 outsources photography decisions (100 billion operations in 25 ms) to AI #AppleEvent pic.twitter.com/txbBGhDhlc — Wong Joon Ian (@joonian) September 7, 2016  

Glam Rock Monday (Against the Culture Algorithms)

I have this little thesis that the height of western culture was at some point around 1975, with the crescendo beginning in in 1965 and the echo slowly fading through the late 1980s. As evidenced by the fact that popular music from that roughly twenty-year period, give or take, is awesome. The best genre to illustrate this, in my view, is progressive rock – though all manner of art back then, from popular music to children’s films, sought to edify their “consumers,” and elevate themselves, by aspiring to the status of “high art.” For this reason, I have a series of blog posts I occasionally…

On witch hunts (in defence of Judge Persky)

Today, Brock Turner, the Stanford University swimmer convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault, was released from prison after serving three months of a six month sentence.  Widespread outrage has been expressed over this early release, much in the same way that widespread outrage was expressed when the sentence was first handed down. This prompted Reid Hoffman, Silicon Valley entrepreneur and founder of LinkedIn, to post the following on Medium:  From the post: The low impact of this lenient sentence has been lowered even further because Turner is getting time off for good behavior. For casually assaulting a passed-out woman he’d crossed paths with…