Right against warrantless searches is dead in the UK

Following my last post where I detailed the numerous ways in which the English have few if any of the civil rights enjoyed by their American cousins, the following story from the Guardian also brought to my attention today shows the utter contempt the UK’s supreme judicial body has for the due process rights of the British people: The court held that there was a risk that a random, “suspicionless”, power of stop-and-search could be used in an arbitrary and discriminate manner in individual cases. But the deputy president of the supreme court, Lady Hale, sitting with Lord Clarke, Lord Reed,…

Freedom of speech is dead in the UK

Following my last post where I detailed the numerous ways in which the English have few if any of the civil rights enjoyed by their American cousins, yet another story has been brought to my attention on social media. Which the BBC covered without the slightest whiff of complaint or alarm. See here: The former Lib-Dem political activist admitted behaving in a threatening or abusive manner by violating a security cordon, shouting and failing to desist, attempting to approach Mr Cameron and causing fear and alarm. He was handed a community payback order with the condition he has to carry out…

A comparison of American and English Civil Liberties

This is a long blog post. Can you summarise it in a line? I can: the United Kingdom is not a free country. When quoting Winston Churchill or the Bible verbatim on a street corner is enough to get you arrested and charged with a crime, freedom isn’t merely losing. It’s lost.  And if the UK can slide quite as far as it has, much of it taking place in the last 15 years, so can any other English-speaking country. This includes the United States. Below, I set out many political rights Americans have that the British do not in a handy tabular…